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The transmission lineage

SummaryTo receive a complete and authentic transmission of the Path to Enlightenment it is necessary to rely on a genuine Teacher connected to a transmission lineage with an uninterrupted current of blessing. It is through the Masters of the lineage that the current of grace and of realisation flows through generations from Master to Disciple beginning with the primordial Vajradhara Master, who is nothing but the pure manifestation of the Buddha Shakyamuni, the historical Buddha, up to nowadays.In order to receive a complete and authentic transmission of the Path to Enlightenment, it is necessary to rely on a genuine Master connected to a transmission line where the current of grace is uninterrupted.Meeting with such a Master is not a coincidence. It is only possible by the ripening of past actions and wishes.So when the Master is revealed to us, it is through him that we have access to the path without error.This Master is called ‘Root’ because he is the source of all grace and of getting the achievement.Learn moreIt is through the Masters of the lineage that the current of grace and achievement flows through generations from Master to Disciple ever since the primordial Vajradhara Master, who is no one else than the pure manifestation of the Buddha Shakyamuni, the historical Buddha.Tilopa (988-1069) was the first Master of our lineage, but in reality he himself gathers four transmission current, hence the name ‘Ka gyu’ lineage, which actually means Ka bab gyi chi gyu pa : four streams of transmission of the speech of the Enlightened.Tilopa received transmissions in the East from Sukhasiddhi, from Tanglopa, from Chinglopa and Karnaripa; in the South from Nagarjuna, from Aryadeva, Chandrakirti and Matangi; in the West from Dhombipa, Vinapa, Lavapa and Indrabhuti; and in the North from Luipa, Drengipa, Darikapada and Sukhadhari. But his main Master was the Celestial Buddha Vajradhara from whom he received the direct transmission of teachings. Mahamudra particularly was revealed to him in this way. He brought together many Indian schools of Tantra and collected them into a single system expressible in seven parts. These teachings thus come both directly from Buddha Vajradhara and from his many human Masters. He had many disciples and the main ones were Lalitavajra and Naropa.Naropa (1016-1100), one of his main disciples received all of his instructions and became the second master of the lineage of transmission of the Words (of the Buddha). His main disciples were Dombhi Heruka (Dhombipa) Shantipa (Shantideva) Maitripa (Master of Saraha’s lineage) Shantibhadra, Pitopa, Dipamkara Atisha (his principal disciple was Dromtonpa) and Marpa.Marpa (1012-1097), the great Tibetan translator became the custodian of his instructions and passed tehm down to Tibet, the land of snow. His most important disciples were Djetsun Milarepa, Ngotchou Dorje, Tsourton Wanguyé, Méton Tsonpo.Milarepa (1052-1135) was the holder of his instructions that he achieved after a life of asceticism in the solitude of the mountains. He had many disciples and the main ones were Je Gampopa, Rechungpa, Chiwa Eu Repa, Sewang Répa, Ngang Dzong Djangtchoub Dordjé, Khyira Répa, Drigom Répa et Sangyé Kyab Répa.Gampopa (1079-1153) was the custodian of the transmission of Milarepa and the Kadampa Masters from Djowo Atisha. He had many disciples and the main ones were Tusoum Khyenpa, Phagmo Drou Dorje Gyaltsen, Eungom Tsultrim Nyingpo, Dharma Wangchuk and Salton Chogom (who had no human disciple). Phagdrou Dorje Gyaltsen had eight main disciples Djigten Soum Gueun, Linrépa Padma Dorje, Tangpa Tashi Pal, Tcheudjé Marwa Drouptop, Drogueun Gyaltsa, Yerpa Yeshe Senge and Ngyiphou Yergom Chenpo.Tusoum Kyenpa (1110-1193) was the successor of this prestigious lineage. Then came a succession of Masters and Disciples with regular appearances of Karmapas.